Category Archives for "Did you Know?"

10 Habits that Could be Harming Your Teeth!

Are These Habits Harming Your Teeth? 

We admit it – We are all living hectic and busy lifestyles, and hence we all tend to fall prey to various bad habits. Most of the time, we don’t even acknowledge our habits and fail to see the harm behind them. These habits can initially appear harmless, but when we look at these habits on a long-term perspective, we might feel alarmed about the potential threats they can have on our health. By the time we realize it, we might be too late to reverse the damage created on our body and health. Surprisingly, there are a lot of bad habits and small actions that can pose negative effects on our teeth.

Since teeth are one of the most important parts of our body, it is important that we get rid of certain habits and rectify certain actions that we do on a day-to-day basis to ensure optimal health for our teeth. As your Mississauga family dentist, we are always behind you in achieving optimal oral health and by raising awareness to these habits; you may be able to avoid the potential negative effects before it is too late.

Here is a list of common habits that you may be doing that can potentially be harmful to the health of your teeth:

  1. Utilizing Your Teeth as a Tool
    We use our teeth for consuming food, but we often end up using them as our primary tool for several activities. Some of us may be guilty of opening bottles, ripping open packages and holding things using our teeth. As tempting as it may be, our teeth are not meant to be used as scissors. These activities can cause damage to the teeth, putting unnecessary stress to them and should definitely be avoided!

  2. Biting Your Nails
    Nail biting is one of the most common habits and is definitely a habit that can prove harmful in the long run. It can very much damage the shape of your teeth and cause layers of enamel to break down – which can eventually lead to tooth sensitivity and chipped/fractured teeth.

  3. Use of Tobacco
    Not only does smoking impact the health of your heart and lungs, the use of tobacco has multiple effects to the mouth as well. Smoking increases your risk for gum disease and oral cancer, can cause dry mouth and bad breath, and decrease healing time.

  4. Chewing Ice
    Chewing ice seems like a pretty harmless activity but can often result in cracked and chipped teeth, damage to tooth enamel, problems with existing dental work (such as fillings and crowns) and sore jaw muscles.

  5. Using Toothpicks
    Whenever we eat certain types of food, especially chicken or meat, a lot of the residue will get stuck in between the gaps of our teeth. People often pick up toothpicks in order to lodge that residue out from in between their teeth, but little do they realize that they can be causing damage to their gums. Floss, floss picks, soft piks, and proxabrushes are all great aids designed for getting you out of those sticky situations. Ask your dental hygienist how you can ditch the toothpicks and opt for other interdental aids that are better suited for you.

  6. Consuming Too Many Sugary Foods and Beverages
    Although sugary foods and beverages might taste good, they can be harmful to our teeth and increase our risk in developing cavities. Always ensure that you are brushing away the harmful sticky bacteria after consuming something high in sugar.

  7. Falling Asleep Without Brushing
    We all have those tiring days where all we want to do is lay in bed and sleep as soon as we get home. However although we are asleep, the bacteria in our mouth are still very much active. Taking those two extra minutes to brush right before you hit the hay can save your teeth from developing cavities.

  8. Grinding/Clenching Your Teeth
    Although we may not realize it, we may find ourselves clenching our teeth during the day or grinding during our sleep. This can take a toll on our enamel and lead to further tooth damage. It is important that we make a conscious effort in catching ourselves clenching and relieve our jaw muscles when we do so in order to loosen up the pressure of our muscles. Since night time grinding is involuntary, special guards can be customized to you in order to prevent damage to your teeth.

  9. Using a Hard Bristle Toothbrush
    Although people may think that the harder the bristle, the cleaner your teeth will feel, hard bristle toothbrushes are actually more damaging than you would think. They often cause irreversible effects such as gum recession and enamel wear. Switch your hard bristle toothbrush for a soft or an extra soft one.

  10. Regular Soda Consumption
    Carbonated beverages are highly acidic and can have loads of sugar in it. Having pop as a regular part of your diet can cause acid erosion to your teeth, which can in turn weaken the enamel and make you more prone to getting cavities.


If you exhibit some of the habits above, don’t be too hard on yourself. By becoming more conscious of these habits, it will help you to reduce further damage to your teeth. Whether you tackle the habits all at once, or work on improving them little by little, you’ll be making a big difference in your oral health. If you need help breaking any of these habits, contact us at Credit River Dental Centre and we’ll be sure to work with you in achieving all of your oral health goals!

Eat Junk food? Don’t Let It Eat You!

We are finally in the summer solstice and boy, does it come hot! What better ways to cool down than to hit the beach and go for a swim, the splash pads and water parks, and of course those tasty ice cream treats for after! You make sure that your freezer is stacked with icy treats to keep the kids (and maybe yourself) sweetly cool. Those delicious smoothie recipes are definitely on top of the list!

As your Mississauga dental team, we understand that indulging in some cool treats is one of the perks of hot summer days. We love our ice cream too! July has more than ten dedicated days that celebrate all sorts of junk food; National Strawberry Sundae Day, Peach Ice Cream Day, National Chocolate Day, and even includes National Junk Food Day on July 21st, which is the same day as National Ice Cream Day. And while these especially bizarre days only come once a year, it’s easy to over indulge and soak in all that sugar along with the sun.

Although cavities are not directly caused by sugar, the acids created by the bacteria in your mouth that feed off the sugar are the culprits. The more sugar you feed those bacteria, the more acid they produce and heighten the risk for bacterial infections, or cavities. Did you know that a single can of coke contains a whopping 9.75 teaspoons of sugar, which is equivalent to 39 grams of sugar? The Heart & Stroke foundation advises that consumption should be kept at 10% of the total calories per day from added sugars. 5% is ideal for an average 2000 calorie a day diet. That works out to roughly 12 teaspoons or 48 grams of sugar. That is over 80% of how much sugar is recommended daily in one single can serving! A single cup of ice cream can contain around 7 teaspoons of sugar or around 28 grams. That is more than 50% of what is recommended, so it is easy to surpass your daily sugar intake if you don’t keep mindful!

And even though it is okay to have one once in a while, you may want to consider swapping a soda here and there for a more refreshing glass of water which hydrates you more than any can of soda can! A swap for frozen yogurt would also be a good alternative! Sometimes small changes can create big differences, and your taste buds won’t be able to tell the difference!

To minimize the risk of developing cavities, it is crucial to brush and floss your teeth regularly and schedule regular dental visits. Brushing your teeth at least twice a day for at least two minutes with fluoridated toothpaste ensures you keep your teeth plaque-free and healthy. Dental cleanings only takes a few minutes every couple months to ensure we can help you maintain your oral health. This is why it is very important to maintain regular and proper oral health so that your smile shines brighter than the sun! We at Credit River Dental strive to make sure your smile is as hot as the summer! Call us today to book your appointment today 905-278-4297!

Could These Common Diseases Be Contributing to Tooth Decay?

No part of the body functions truly independently, and your teeth are no exception. Your mouth is a window to the rest of your body and will often show warning signs if there is something bigger going on. If you’ve ever wondered why we ask so many questions about your medical history and lifestyle, it is because we are trying to understand the entire picture, along with what your mouth and oral health are telling us. There are many more things that can contribute to tooth decay rather than just poor oral hygiene. In fact, common diseases such as diabetes, autoimmune conditions, and eating disorders are examples of some systemic disease that do in fact impact the health of our teeth. As your Mississauga family dentist, we feel that it is important for you to be educated on the oral-systemic links in order to achieve optimal oral health. Common systemic conditions are:

  1. Diabetes
    Diabetes is perhaps the most significant cause and effect relationship with tooth decay. Whether you have type I or type II diabetes, your body’s blood sugar level is elevated because of lowered insulin levels. This impacts many parts of your body and the mouth as well. One of the most common symptoms of diabetes is dry mouth. Beyond making your mouth feel more comfortable, saliva acts as your mouth’s natural cleansing system, and protects your teeth against the bacteria that cause tooth decay. Lack of salivary flow makes your teeth more vulnerable and more prone to developing cavities.

    As the tooth decay continues to build up, the risk for gum disease also increases due to the continual buildup of bacteria in your mouth. In fact, about a quarter of all people diagnosed with diabetes also develop gum disease. To further complicate this situation, gum disease can cause blood sugar levels to rise, which can in turn, increase the severity of the diabetes. It is a vicious cycle that needs to be addressed as soon as symptoms begin to develop.

  2. Autoimmune Conditions
    Autoimmune conditions are a family of diseases that involve the body attacking parts of itself. This can include everything from major organ systems such as kidneys, to smaller systems such as salivary glands. Many of these diseases have an impact on the mouth, but the one that is most directly tied to oral health is Sjögeren’s syndrome. Sjögeren’s syndrome reduces the amount of saliva the mouth produces, which has the same effects we described earlier with diabetes. With extreme cases, patients may not even produce saliva at all.

    People with Sjögeren’s are advised to make more frequent visits to the dentist in order to monitor and keep watch of any tooth decay as a result from the decreased saliva flow. There are also several over the counter products that can be used in order to manage the symptoms and increase salivary flow. Products including xylitol – a natural saliva stimulant – will be quite beneficial to those experiencing dry mouth.

  3. Anorexia and Bulimia
    Both anorexia and bulimia are severe eating disorders in which a person has an extreme fear of becoming overweight, and either eat less or regurgitate food as a result. Both conditions have implications on the teeth because the body is not receiving the proper amount of minerals, vitamins, proteins and other nutrients that are needed in maintaining good oral health and preventing tooth decay. A person who is bulimic may binge eat and then vomit, which allows the acid that is breaking down the food to eat away at the tooth enamel. Overtime, the acid will weaken the tooth structure, making it more prone to getting cavities.

Avoid Tooth Decay with Total Body Care

These are just a few of the more common diseases that contribute to tooth decay. The connection between your mouth and body are not always apparent, which is why it is important to share your medical history with your dentist. Our team at Credit River Dental Centre will work with you in order to develop a treatment plan that integrates your mouth with the rest of your body for a full-body approach. To learn more speak to your dental team at Credit River Dental Centre or book your appointment today at (905) 278-4297 and take control of your oral health!

Want Whiter Teeth Without Bleaching?

Here are 5 makeup tips that can make your teeth look whiter

  1. Lipstick Shade
    With lipsticks, the key is to look for those with bluer undertones as opposed to yellow. Slightly purple tones will help teeth appear somewhat whiter than those that lean yellow or orange. How does it work? If we look at the colour wheel, blue and orange/yellow sit across from each other, so blue tones tend to cancel out orange or yellow tones when placed side by side together, and vice versa. Therefore, lipsticks with a blue base will help cancel out any orange or yellow tones on your teeth.
    Red lipstick usually lean one of blue, pink, or orange. Blue tones will provide the greatest whitening effect, pink tones will be relatively neutral, and orange tones will provide a slightly yellowing effect. Unfortunately, darker shades in general will make teeth appear slightly yellower.
  2. Bronzer
    As far as having an influence on the appearance of your teeth, your bronzer can either lead to your ultimate downfall or make you a star. Avoid going too orange but rather use a subtle taupe-toned bronzer in order to lift your teeth an entire shade brighter.
  3. Eye Makeup
    Similar to the way your teeth will look whiter if you use a lipstick with cool or blue undertones, wearing cooler eyeshadows will help to deflect any yellow tones. Wear purple, blue and silver eyeshadows through the winter months in orderto brighten your smile, whereas in the spring try green and turquoise lids.
  4. Contour the curves of your mouth
    Your lips can appear fuller by accentuating the shape of your mouth and, combine that with a berry-toned lipstick in order to kick up the shine in your teeth. Trace around the edge of your lip line with a highlighting pencil while putting some extra emphasis on the curve of your cupid's bow.
  5. Lip Gloss
    Similar in the way cooler hues in lipsticks can help to enhance the appearance of your pearly whites, the flecks of shimmer or glitter in your lip gloss follow a similar colour rule. Toss away any glosses that contain gold or bronze-toned glitter, and choose one with a silver shimmer instead in order to offer a sparkly smile.
    And of course if you would like to whiten your teeth the more traditional way then please do not hesitate to contact us at the Credit River Dental Centre in beautiful Port Credit, Mississauga.

www.creditriverdental.com
905.278.4297
dentistry@creditriverdental.com



Vaping and Your Oral Health: What You May Not Know!

Most people are now likely aware of the negative effects of smoking cigarettes to their overall and oral health, however what is less known are the effects that vaping has on your oral health. Although this is a healthier alternative to smoking, there are still some negative side effects that we believe everyone should be aware of.

First off, what exactly is vaping? Vaping is the process of consuming nicotine or other substances through a vaporizer or an electronic cigarette. Vaping allows you to consume nicotine at controlled levels without actually smoking cigarettes and is often used as an aid to quit smoking. These battery powered devices heat liquid (also known as e-juice) to produce a fog-like vapor. The number of people in Canada who use vaporizers/e-cigarettes has tripled over the last four years and its popularity continues to grow as the years progress.

Vaping became a much more effective and safer alternative in comparison to smoking cigarettes. Although vape oil/e-juice does not contain any tobacco – which is the main ingredient in cigarettes – it may contain nicotine, which can pose a variety of significant health risks on its own. Although there are options of using nicotine-free oils, the majority of people using vaporizers do prefer adding nicotine to their oils.

As this new trend becomes more prominent in our society, we, at Credit River Dental Centre, want everyone who currently vapes or is considering vaping to understand and educate themselves about the potential consequences behind it.

Here are five ways vaping can affect your oral health :

  1. Increased Risk of Tooth decay
    • Regardless of if there is nicotine or not, vaping tends to dry out the mouth. Salivary flow is crucial to maintaining good oral health because it protects us by breaking down food particles and allows the good bacteria to work in our mouths.
  2. Bad Breath
    • Since nicotine compromises your body’s ability to produce saliva – your mouth’s self-cleansing agent – you are more likely to have excess build up of bacteria in your mouth, which can lead to bad breath.
  3. Bruxism/Tooth Grinding
    • Nicotine stimulates your muscles, which can make you feel restless or agitated, triggering bruxism. Teeth grinding causes wear to the enamel, which can eventually lead to exposed dentin and increased temperature sensitivity.
  4. Periodontal Disease
    • Nicotine consumption can lead to gum disease because it causes the blood vessels to shrink. This compromises the blood flow and negatively impacts our immune cell function. Due to less blood flow and a weakened immune defense response, the risk of gum disease becomes much more significant.

  5. Gum Recession
    • Vaping and smoking can both cause damage to tissue cells in your mouth. Due to the lack of blood flow to the gums, your gums are unable of receiving the nutrients and oxygen that it needs. This can cause the gums to recede and also cause pockets to form in between your gums and your teeth.

Due to the multiple effects of vaping to your oral health, you may be wondering what you can do in order to reduce the risks and damage caused by regular vape use. In order to prevent these effects, you must aim to maintain exceptional oral hygiene practices. You should be brushing your teeth at least two to three times daily, flossing daily, brushing your tongue and using an antibacterial mouth rinse to reduce the amount of bacteria in your mouth. Increasing your water intake and frequent rinsing can also aid in avoiding dry mouth. Due to the effects of nicotine, switching to lower nicotine or no nicotine e-liquids will also be helpful in reducing the effects. We also recommend scheduling regular hygiene appointments in order for us to monitor your oral health status and prevent progression of gum disease.

As your Mississauga Dentist, your oral health is our top priority. Our goal is to ensure that we are able to provide you with the information needed in order to educate you on achieving your optimal oral health. If you have any further questions, you can contact our team at Credit River Dental Centre at 905-278-4297.

Celebrate Your Smile This April!

April is Oral Health Month and an important part of this celebration is National Dental Hygiene Week, which takes place from April 6th to 13th. Here at Credit River Dental Centre, we recognize our hygienists as an integral part of our team, as they ensure our patients and their smiles are greatly taken are of! National Dental Hygiene Week also reminds us to focus on the importance of our oral health and emphasizes the goal of dental hygienists in terms of achieving “oral health for total health” for everyone.

The primary role of dental hygienists is oral disease prevention, in order to improve and maintain patients’ overall physical and mental well-being. As one of your primary health care providers, dental hygienists are valuable partners in terms of prevention and play an important role in everyone’s life. Our oral health is deeply connected to our general health, and the conditions within our mouths can signal more serious issues within our bodies. Dental hygienists can work collaboratively with you in order to develop oral self-care routines, and offer treatment recommendations and disease preventing strategies in order to benefit you and your oral health. Whether it be through introducing toddlers to their first dental visit or providing care to adults with periodontal disease, dental hygienists want to ensure that you have a healthy smile for life. 

Oral Health Month and National Dental Hygienists Week gives everyone a perfect opportunity to create new oral health goals in order to improve one’s oral condition. The Canadian Dental Hygienists Association have formulated a chart with some oral health tips that can help to set you up for success and allow you to achieve your greatest smile! If you have any further questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to contact us and ask your dental hygienist about what she/he can do to help you improve your overall oral health!

Benzocaine…Not for Teething Pain!

As your Mississauga dental office, informing our patients and the community about potential dental concerns is our utmost priority. As parents it’s always heartbreaking to hear your children crying especially when they are in discomfort and we feel helpless to relieve that pain. This can be true of pain in the mouth whether it’s coming from an emerging tooth or a canker sore. In the past few years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning parents against using products that contain benzocaine for treating teething discomfort. In fact, they are now taking action to get the products off store shelves because they are linked to a rare but potentially dangerous illness.

According to a May 23, 2018 press release, "OTC oral health products containing the pain reliever benzocaine for the temporary relief of sore gums due to teething in infants or children should no longer be marketed and [the FDA] is asking companies to stop selling these products for such use. If companies do not comply, the FDA will initiate a regulatory action to remove these products from the market."

Benzocaine is a topical anesthetic (pain reliever), and is the active ingredient found in a number products used to treat mouth pain including Anbesol, Cepacol, Hurricaine, Orajel and Topex. It's also available as a generic medication or a store brand, and may come in the form of a gel, spray, ointment or lozenge. Regardless of the name or the form, however, it's unsafe for babies and young children to use.

Benzocaine has been linked with a disease called methemoglobinemia - an uncommon but serious and potentially fatal condition. This illness occurs when the blood contains high levels of methemoglobin, a hemoglobin-like protein. Because methemoglobin carries less oxygen to body tissues than hemoglobin, an excess of this substance can cause shortness of breath, fatigue and dizziness - and in more severe cases, seizures, coma and death.

So what options do parents have to ease discomfort that may be caused by teething? According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, there are a number of simple things that may help.

  • Give young children a clean rubber or silicone teething ring that has been chilled in the refrigerator (not frozen), or a cold, wet washcloth to chew on. A chilled pacifier may also be helpful - but be sure anything you put in baby's mouth is free of potentially harmful substances like lead paint.
  • Try gently massaging the gums with a clean finger - this can counteract the pressure of an emerging tooth and help soothe the irritation.
  • If pain persists, ask your doctor or pharmacist to recommend an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, in a dosage that's appropriate for your child. However, do not give your child alcohol in any form!

If you have any further questions or concerns regarding the discomfort your child may be experiencing while teething don’t hesitate to call your Mississauga Dentist at Credit River Dental Centre!

The Mouth is the Source to Your Body

You get to your dental appointment a few minutes early and just when you’re about to sit down, you’re asked by your friendly dental patient coordinator to fill out what looks like a 10 page booklet of questions about your previous dental history and medical history. As you flip through the pages, you wonder to yourself-wow, why is your dental professional asking so many questions?

After a few minutes or so upon completing your so called medical/dental history booklet, you’re then brought into the room. Yes, the room where your comprehensive oral examination will take place. As you sit patiently looking up at the television screen, the dentist comes in to greet you and explains what will happen within the next hour of your examination and what we hope to achieve as we gather all of this information about you.

“So let’s start by taking your blood pressure,” he begins. At this moment, like most, you start to question why, as your blood pressure is suddenly recorded a little higher than what’s considered normal. Your arm’s quite a distance from your teeth. What does this have to do with my mouth? The flood gate of questions begins.

Your dental professional then asks you, “Do you know what your blood pressure normally is?” “When was the last time you had a physical?” or “Any family history of heart disease?” You start getting a little concerned and answer as best you can. So yes, why do we take blood pressure, need your medical history and ask the questions that we do? Knowing information such as this is important in understanding how your body will react to treatments that may be done. It helps your dental professional to understand if there are any underlying conditions that may also affect the outcome of treatment and also if there is a potential for any condition or medication to contra-indicate it.

Have you ever heard the term “Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure?” We take this very seriously in our practice. This is often where dentistry and medicine are different.

After we collect the necessary baseline information, your dentist will then design a customized treatment plan for you. This will entail the frequency of hygiene appointments which is based on your periodontal evaluation and current medical condition, restore any decayed teeth and discuss preventative measures to be taken for this, and also an evaluation of any potential risks for conditions such as sleep apnea, teeth grinding (bruxism), oral cancer, etc.

Dentistry is very focused on prevention. How many times does your medical doctor ask you when you last visited your dentist? Or better yet, how often do you visit your dental professional? Does the head, neck and mouth magically not connect to the rest of the body? Or are they just not informed about the importance of Oral Health to the overall health of the body?

Lately, more attention has been paid to the Oral-Systemic Link.

When inflammation exists in the mouth, experts have equated this to having a wound the size of your hand.

If you had a wound the size of your hand, would you not have it treated or be just a tad bit concerned? Inflammation is inflammation regardless of where it is in our bodies and it is important that both medical and dental professionals recognize this. What’s unfortunate about periodontal disease is that damage can progress without any pain and oftentimes when discomfort occurs, it is beyond repair.

Dentistry has changed over the years. Prevention is key in maintaining balance not only in our bodies but in our mouths as well. You could very well take care of your body; feed it healthy food, exercise, take supplements, and more but if your oral care is not up to par and there is a presence of even the slightest bleeding upon flossing or brushing, this is a clean indication that inflammation may be present. A cleaning isn’t just a cleaning when you see your dental hygienist regularly. It entails so much more but the most important part of your hygiene appointment is reducing the amount of bacterial contamination in the mouth which will reduce the inflammation.

To learn more speak to your dental team at Credit River Dental Centre or book your appointment today at (905) 278-4297 and take control of your oral health!

Tooth or False? 5 Fun Facts You May Not Know!

Being your top choice Mississauga dental team, we love to share important information and advice when it comes to great oral health. Dental health is a serious matter to ensure proper oral health, but who said it can’t be fun? Check out some of these fun facts that will make you smile!

  1. Tooth enamel is the second strongest compound in the world after diamonds! This makes it the strongest substance in your entire body. Tooth enamel consists of mainly calcium and phosphate mineral crystals, which makes it stronger than even your bones. It is made up of 96% minerals and makes it one of the only few parts of your body that can’t fix itself, therefore maintaining healthy oral care is crucial to keep your all natural diamond smile nice and strong!

  2. On average, a person produces about 2 to 4 pints of saliva a day. That equates to approximately 25,000 quarts in a lifetime! Saliva keeps your mouth hydrated, prevents bacteria from reproducing and causing cavities and bad breath. Saliva also contains a chemical called opiorphin that is six times more potent than morphine! According to a team of French researchers from Pasteur Institute in Paris, France , a study that included isolating opiorphin and injecting them into rats found that the chemical was so effective that the rats needed six times the amount of morphine to render the same effects! Unfortunately not everyone has an adequate amount of saliva and if you don’t it can be detrimental to your oral health. If you have any concerns about your saliva production speak with your dental professional at your next dental visit.

  3. The jaw consists of the most powerful muscle in the body based on weight called the masseter. In conjunction to all the jaw muscles working together, the jaw can actually close the teeth with a brute force up to 55 pounds on the incisors or up to 200 pounds on the molars! Talk about a powerhouse mouth! We also know that with great power, comes great responsibility! If you know or suspect you grind your teeth, bringing it up at your next visit would be a good idea as a night guard may be advised. Teeth grinders often have stronger jaw muscles, so you want to make sure you still protect those pearly whites! When grinding or bruxism is a concern, your dental profession can help prevent further trauma or possibly damage to your teeth. Make sure to mention this at your next dental visit.

  4. Patients who are expectant mothers have a high risk of delivering premature and low birth weight babies if there is a presence of Periodontal Disease. With the rise of hormones, morning sickness, and diet choices during pregnancy, your oral health is more susceptible to infection, disease and inflammation if proper oral hygiene care isn’t practiced. Be sure to let us know prior to treatment if you are pregnant so we can assure both you and baby are safe!

  5. Scheduling regular dental hygiene appointments can help prevent heart attacks! We all know that keeping your teeth and gums clean helps steer clear of cavities and gum disease, so it’s important to have your hygiene treatments done regularly to help avoid exacerbating conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. When was your last hygiene appointment? As your Mississauga Dental Team we strive to ensure that your optimal oral health is our primary goal.

Call us today at (905) 278-4297 and we’d be more than happy to book an appointment for you!

Carbonated Water…What you should know.

When we drink acidic drinks, like sodas, fruit juices, or (mildly) acidic bubbly waters, the minerals in our teeth dissolve in a process called demineralization. Saliva pH is between approximately 5.5-6.5, depending on the phosphate and calcium ions in your body. The more ions in your spit, the lower the critical pH, or in other words, the more acid your teeth can withstand before demineralizing. The pH of most bubbly waters might be below the critical pH for most mouths, but the claims that these waters are ‘extremely acidic’ are completely false. The pH of Gatorade is about 3, of orange juice is about 3-4 and of Coke is 2.4. If the pH to stay above is ~6 (tap water is ~7), then drinking your daily Perrier warm, or even better warm and flat would be best. That is not how most people enjoy their Perrier however so the best thing to do is to rinse your mouth afterwards with some tap water.

While sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water as well. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities and helps to wash away cavity-causing bacteria. It also helps to keep your mouth from becoming dry which can also increase the risk of cavities.

Not all sparkling waters are created equally, however. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that can increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with your meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.

Although sparkling water doesn't contain sugar, it is carbonated. It's the carbonation of sparkling water that has some people worried. A few studies have been performed in order to examine the acidity of various drinks, including sparkling water. One, published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, measured the pH of nearly 400 beverages. The drinks included a mix of sweetened sodas, sports drinks, juices, teas and sparkling waters. It was found that while a majority of sports drinks were rated as "extremely erosive,", certain sparkling waters ranked as "minimally erosive."

Ada McVean at McGill University conducted a similar study testing the pH of nine different brands of sparkling water. She tested the drinks at refrigerator temperature and room temperature, as well as in carbonated form and decarbonated form. In all of her tests, the waters had a pH above 4.0 meaning “minimally erosive”. The pH went up when the waters were at room temperature and when they were decarbonated, suggesting that sparkling water is more erosive in the form in which you're most likely to drink it (cold and bubbly).

So, is sparkling water bad for your teeth? 

The short story here is that sparkling water is much less erosive than many other beverages. To keep your teeth as healthy as possible, the American Dental Association recommends swapping sugary beverages for sparkling water, but not replacing regular, fluoridated water with sparkling water. Skip the Pepsi and quench the craving with some S. Pellegrino, your teeth will thank you, and your blood sugar will too.

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